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We’ve switched bulls again and sadly Floyd went off to market on Monday along with three barren cows.  They were taken in a lorry but Dan went to the sale in the afternoon to see how they did.  Quite well, is the answer although Dan was quite sad when he came home.  This is why Gordon and I won’t actually take them ourselves – we’re obviously too soft.  Felix the Red is now in play although currently ensconced with about forty heifers on the riverbank.  He was originally turned in with eleven and the last of those calved this morning.  We’ve had a fairly mixed bunch: male, female and stillborn, but following a discussion between the three of us we decided all calves born to Felix this year should be sold.  For the first time ever we find ourselves in a situation where we have enough followers to keep us going for the foreseeable future and even before Felix’s offspring arrived we’d already had twenty heifers.  Also, we worked on the theory that if we sell his daughters for the first year we’ll be able to keep him longer before he starts serving them and needs to go.

That plan seemed excellent in theory.  This morning there was a spanner in the works in the form of the last heifer’s calf.  Do you remember the little red calf born some years ago?  She’s been in the herd for several years now and her own daughter calved this morning.  Of course, she has the red genes and Felix is red, so we now have a conundrum in the form of this:

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Excuse the terrible photos, they were taken with my phone.  She’s an Alexandra and red.  Red, for goodness sake!  Gordon and I both love red friesians so it looks like she’ll be staying.  Isn’t she adorable?  The trouble is, this was not in our plans at all.

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Remember a couple of weeks ago we had that big storm overnight?  It took the roof off one of our sheds!  We woke up at about 4.30/5 o’clock-ish to a banging, flapping noise and Gordon jumped out of bed to go to the window, but it was too dark to see anything. Neither of us could go back to sleep so went downstairs and made coffee while we waited for it to be light enough to see the damage. 

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This was the end of the building nearest the house.  The wind had folded the roofing sheets over each other.

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The cows were still in overnight at the time and we were worried they may have been hurt, but luckily not one was even scratched.  The roof didn’t fare so well. Gordon and Dan spent the day unrolling the sheets and fixing them back down although the light sheets were shattered and still haven’t been replaced.

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The cows have gone out for the summer despite the cold and still-damp ground.  As usual they’re pleased to get back to grass, but need no persuasion to come in for milking twice a day when they get cake.  The grass doesn’t seem to be growing very well yet.  They’ve gone into fields we normally cut for silage to eat off the grass as we’ve been informed the solar panels are imminent.  Having waited such a long time for any progress we’re still dubious and cynical about whether it will happen, but supplies are starting to arrive which is progress.  

Happy Easter

I don’t really celebrate Easter, but thought I should wish you all a happy one, just in case you do.  Farming tends to rely more on the seasons than what ‘holiday’ we’re celebrating at the time.  The cows don’t know it’s Easter and still insist on being milked every day so we plod on.

We’re busy with calving at the moment and are already at our desired number of heifers for the year.  We still have about four-fifths of the herd to calve and are once again debating what to do with the extra girlies.  When we had our first bull we were desperate for replacements and kept all that were born, but considering there were fifty last year alone and twenty so far this year, I suspect we may have reached our target.

Our solar panel plans continue with the company who are putting them in informing us they’ll make a start after Easter.  Of course, they also said they’d start straight after Christmas so until lorries roll up we won’t be expecting too much.  Everything we do in the meantime is on hold, waiting for the first rent payment to roll in.  With milk prices dropping all the time, this is becoming a bit of a necessity.

The weather has been fantastic here apart from the odd little bit of rain.  I have some beautiful Christmas roses in the garden and despite a bad back, have been crawling underneath them to reveal their full beauty – honestly, the things I’ll do for a good photo.

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And the redness of this one.  Sadly they’re so much more attractive from underneath as the flowers tend to hang down.DSCN7511Due to the clear weather Terri and I have started visiting National Trust properties and started with Lytes Cary Manor (or Scary Manor as dad likes to call it).  They have some great weathervanes there – I think I may be a little obsessed with them although we only have an old one here.  Perhaps I should look into getting a good one for the top of the old barn in the yard?DSCN7590

Although it wasn’t too cold there the day was hazy, which gave a great effect to my tree photos with the stripes of hazy hills in the background.

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This morning Secret World, a rescue centre near here, had an open day and I went along with Terri and her husband Steve to see the animals.  There weren’t many out and about, but there was a lovely European eagle owl called Daphne, a male turkey strutting his stuff with his wings and tail puffed right up to impress the ladies and a strange, bedraggled-looking emu called, imaginatively ‘Emu’. He kept peering at us through the fence and when we walked around the outside he kept pace on the inside.  Emus are weird-looking things, aren’t they?

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A month on

I had an email to remind me that I haven’t posted for a month and debated whether to call it a day on my blog.  Obviously I reached a decision and it looks like you might be stuck with me for a little while longer so I hope that’s ok?

Since I last posted we lost Gordon’s mother, rather suddenly and unexpectedly as it turns out.  She was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis and whilst there suffered a fatal heart attack.  The funeral was last Friday, the family gathered and caught up and now it’s over bar the sorting out.  Gordon’s sister and her husband are doing most of the work as they did when she was alive, and we’re helping if she needs us, but it was a shock.

I’ve been trying to maintain my more proactive lifestyle and have cleared a fair bit of rubbish around the house.  Things have been donated, sold, chucked out or given away but there’s a lot more to go.  Gordon has once again promised that the bathroom will be sorted this year.  We even got a quote from a builder but have to clear a room before anything starts – the room we euphemistically call our ‘box room’. I’m holding out hope for an airing cupboard.

We had a new door fitted in our back hall, which once upon a time was the front hall until a new road turned our house around. This one is clear at the top so we can see directly into the garden with coloured glass inserts which means when the sun shines it makes a pattern on the floor and fills the hall with light.  During the day I love it, but when it’s dark outside I find it a bit spooky.  I suggested a curtain but Gordon disagrees so I try not to look at it.  How sad is that?  A few years ago Gordon looked up from the television to see a face pressed against the window looking in.  It was a deer in the garden!  I may have died of fright at that stage!

Yesterday we TB tested the herd and the vet comes back on Thursday to analyse the results.  Once again, cross your fingers for us.

Scaredy cat

As you may recall we currently have four cats: Cinders, Thomas, Gizmo and Scamp.  Cinders and Thomas are both fairly advanced in years and have perfected the art of getting we humans to open the door for them rather than exert themselves by going through the catflap.  Of course if there’s no human to hand they will manage unaided.

This afternoon Cinders was meowing by the door, I opened it for her then turned to fetch Dan’s coffee.  The catflap rattled and she was back through again.  I cussed her for wasting my time, told her she should make up her mind where she wanted to be, opened the door and found myself face-to-face with a very startled fox in the porch. 

That would explain her reluctance! 

Yoghurt and crochet

For Christmas I requested and received a yoghurt maker from Lakeland.  I had the equipment to make yoghurt years ago after mum bought me a contraption that looked a bit like heated rollers with individual glass pots at a jumble sale.  When I turned it on to test it there was a slightly odd singeing smell which made me nervous so rather than make a decision about it, I tucked it in the back of the cupboard where it stayed unused for years.  I do this often, but I’m not sure why.  Perhaps I’m under the impression it will improve with age.  It’s gone now and has been for some time although I can’t recall exactly when I decided it wasn’t worth keeping.

Part of my ‘do a thing’ resolution is to stop clinging to these old and unnecessary items.  If I ever need the item and have thrown away the old and decrepid version, let’s face it, nowadays we aren’t far away from the new and improved model for probably a third of the price.

Back to my yoghurt maker.  Normally I would plan to make yoghurt for some time, read the instructions, contemplate them and then maybe get around to doing it.  Not this time!  Out of the box, cleaned as per instructions before first use and switched on.  Two teaspoons of live yoghurt, a pint and a half of boiled milk and eight hours later I had a large pot of my very own yoghurt.  It’s good too, creamy and fresh, and I have the satisfaction of knowing I made it myself from our own milk.  Now I’ve done it once it’ll be more straightforward next time.  I’ve even frozen some to use as starter for the next batch.  I also received butter-making and cheese-making equipment so that’s on my schedule, but I’ll keep you informed.

Another thing on my virtual list (it hasn’t yet made it to paper) is to do something with my very basic knowledge of crochet.  I’ve been researching various stitches online and yesterday I designed (as I went along, truth be known) a crochet flower to use as a brooch.

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It looks black but it’s a shade of blue.  S’alright, isn’t it?  I’m quite chuffed. 

Today my ‘thing’ will be to pack away Christmas and sort out the cupboard I store everything in.  At this rate, by next Christmas I might have a handle on it.

Do a thing

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions?  I usually resolve not to, refusing to jump on the bandwagon and suffering the remorse when I forget all about them in a very short space of time.

That doesn’t mean I haven’t been thinking about it this year though.  While I’ve been milking every morning I’ve given it a bit of casual thought and think my New Year’s resolution might be to ‘do a thing’ every day.  I often think that perhaps I’ll bake tomorrow or organise a cupboard but when the time comes I make an excuse or forget all about it.  Consequently I have frozen fruit in the freezer for when I get round to making jam and a whole heap of stuff waiting to be listed on ebay to name a couple of things – there are many other things waiting to be done.

The thing is, I need to make a decision to do it and then just do it instead of getting distracted or finding something else to do.  Does everyone do this?  I refuse to believe I’m the only person with this problem, but I do know I have it pretty bad.

Consequently and in preparation of a bit of organisation I bought a shoe rack online last week. It came yesterday and I spent almost the whole day assembling it, sorting my shoes which were in the bottom of the wardrobe, sorting my clothes into the space created at the bottom of the wardrobe and generally tidying.  I felt very happy with the end result and was surprised at how satisfying it was.  I even threw things away.

Today I made wholemeal bread with my stand mixer and the dough hook.  I’ve been meaning to do this since I had the mixer for my birthday in 2014, but never got round to it.  It took me less than quarter of an hour.  Quarter of an hour for goodness sake! Then I let the dough prove on top the aga covered with a damp cloth until it was big, stuck it in the oven for twenty minutes and voila!  Bread.  Rather good bread actually, some of which we had with tea.  After that I got a bit carried away and thought I might make scones.  Well, I made something following the recipe but it didn’t look like scone mix to me so I improvised and ended up with something like baked dumplings that taste a bit scone-like, but that’s ok.  Maybe next time?

I haven’t decided what my thing will be tomorrow but maybe I should make a list so I can have the pleasure of ticking things off.  It will be an incredibly long list!  Things done already and the year has yet to start! 

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